9 Comments

  1. Hi,
    I have just found the story of your arrest !
    I also became the interest of the police (3 police cars and 6 officers) for taking images in Medway. But i have to say my experience was a little different to yours.
    This was the image i was taking = http://www.mostphotos.com/626360
    It was the security guard that called the police and i duly waited for their arrival. Unlike yourself i was happy to provide proof of my identity and to allow officers to look at the images in my camera. They could not have been nicer, commenting on each image as good and bad, we had a good conversation about photography and everyone was satisfied i was not a terrorist ( working from a van with orange flashing beacons and wearing hi visibility clothing).
    Yes you have a right to take images of buildings as long as you are not on private property (dont even think of taking shots of Military sites in Medway … Dumb thing to do.) and you have the right to take images of people as long as they are not portraying them in a compromising situation or you are invading their privacy.
    By law you must provide proof of your identity if you refuse you will piss them off and you now know the result …

  2. Until ID cards are foisted on us there is no law that provides for PROOF of identity. Only that you provide a name and address if requested.

  3. If we were required to provide proof of identity to police at their request would that make it illegal to report handbag theft?

  4. Under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 section 3 subsection 3, a constable may ask for your name but you are not obliged to provide it unless you are arrested to be charged with an offence. That offence must exist. In accordance with PACE 3 (3), when completing the record of stop and search, a constable is required to insert a description of you. A good idea is to go onto the Home Office website for stop and search and to print off the details and carry them with you. In the cases I have read about recently, the photographers have good grounds to sue for unlawful arrest, assault, etc.

  5. Judging by your picture here, the guy must have been using a couple of 10×8 Sinars on rather large tripods to merit this much attention.

  6. @ Imagine Imaging:

    That’s a good story, and not the first of its kind to emanate from that place. I enjoyed your thoughtful comment very much.

    However, you state “By law you must provide proof of your identity”. That is not the case. You don’t even have to provide proof of identity if you are stopped and searched. I mean this in the friendliest possible way – if you don’t know the law, don’t quote it. That’s how misinformation spreads.

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