15 Comments

  1. Great. Calm and well-reasoned argument. Good that this has been picked up by the media (you’ve had honourable mentions in The Register, The British Journal of Photography and Amateur Photographer).

    The harassment of photographers continues though and you’ve probably seen the story of the BBC photographer stopped taking pictures of St Paul’s this week. Thought you might like to see links to two separate incidents in Ealing. In the first the local paper’s photographer was stopped twice in a week. In the second the very irate snapper turned the tables on the bullying officer marched him to the station and made a complaint!

    1. http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/news/community_support_police_stop_and_quiz_veteran_press_photographer_under_terrorism_act_2000_news_153278.html

    2. http://hurstm.posterous.com/sat-17th-oct-ealing-broadway-1730-approx

  2. Well put. I suppose the longer it goes on the more publicity this subject gets. I hope you get closure eventually in a manner satisfactory to yourself.
    I and millions of others would not have acted any differently than you IMO so there but for the grace of god and all that…
    You acted in a responsible manner if anyone cares to check the facts.

    Well done mate.

  3. Very nicely done Alex.
    As always you have handled yourself in a far more professional and dignified manner than those who are the alleged professionals.

  4. An absolute pleasure to listen to that interview!
    Very well done Alex!
    Excellent responses, great answers and very constructive!

    You have done yourself and the people that know you proud mate!
    Well done!!

  5. Re. Latest report.
    “Under the 2002 Police Reform Act, PCSOs have the power to demand the name and address of a person suspected of committing a criminal offence or for antisocial behaviour.”
    I see. So someone going about a perfectly legal activity of taking pictures in a public area is suspected of committing a criminal offence? Once again, it seems that plod have over-stepped the mark and have made up the law as they go along. If it’s legal, it’s legal. No two ways about it, so why was he questioned? Is there now a new law that we’ve not heard of that forbids the taking of “too many pictures”? This is now a crime? Totally insane. Just what do the the police think they are going to achieve by harassing perfectly innocent amateur photographers? Alienation is what they are going to achieve, without a doubt!

  6. Thanks Catkins. BBC Breakfast show tomorrow at 07.40. They’re planning on running with the Independent article, interviewing Jerome Taylor and will be showing one of the pictures I took prior to my arrest.

    I’m so pleased the issue is getting the attention it deserves.

  7. You’ve now made the Telegraph

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/philipjohnston/6724053/Photographers-and-anti-terrorism-The-holiday-snaps-that-could-get-you-arrested.html

    “These are not isolated incidents. In the summer, Alex Turner, another amateur photographer, was arrested after he took pictures of Mick’s Plaice, a fish and chip shop in Chatham, Kent, evidently a building of great strategic importance to the jihadi godfathers in Waziristan.”

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